Author Archives: James C. Cureton II

About James C. Cureton II

I am a PhD candidate at the University of Oklahoma interested in the ecology and evolution of fishes, most notably Cypriniformes! Check out my personal website (https://sites.google.com/site/jamesccuretonii/) or follow me on Twitter (@Cureton2J) to stay up-to-date with the blog and other information! I am interested in teaching others about this diverse group of fishes and learning about them from others who are more informed! I started this blog to synthesize common and scientific knowledge of this group in a way that will reveal just how spectacular this group of fishes is! I am also interested in learning from others so if you have some useful information, please share it in the comments section!

How do fish get their colors?

It’s no secret that minnows, suckers (as I found out tonight), and loaches are extremely popular in the aquarium trade. Part of this is due to the hardiness of (some of) these species, but more so due to their extremely … Continue reading

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A conservation success story?

Some of you may have seen the headline “Endangered Nevada Fish Makes Comeback” from the Las Vegas Review-Journal.  Could it be? Could the endangered Moapa Dace (Moapa coriacea) really make a come back and get off the endangered species list? If … Continue reading

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Can aquarists and scientists collectively form a better scientific community?

The reason I started this blog is two-fold. First, there are a lot of aquarists who care for minnows, suckers, and loaches. When I say alot, I mean A LOT. It is highly likely that many of these aquarists have … Continue reading

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Why do several species of minnows breed over the same nest?

For those unaware, I was on a brief hiatus to the Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists annual meeting in Chatanooga, TN! There were numerous exciting talks, especially those pertaining to minnows, and it seems in the near future, there may … Continue reading

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Part III: What are Cypriniforms and why does anyone care?

Welcome to the Part III of “my first blog post!” Part I provided insight into what a Cypriniform is and the distribution of species )across families. Part II focused more on what these fish look like and the final episode of my first … Continue reading

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Part II: What are Cypriniforms and why does anyone care?

Welcome to the Part II of “my first blog post!” Part I provided insight into what a Cypriniform is and the distribution of species across families. Part II will focus more on what these fish look like – i.e., what makes a … Continue reading

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PART I: What are Cypriniforms and why does anyone care?

Minnows, carps, loaches, and their relatives – known as Cypriniforms – are an exceptionally diverse group of fishes (4,182 currently valid species according to the Catalog of Fishes) that come in a wide range of sizes, shapes, and colors . … Continue reading

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